A re-make of The Grinding Mills at Leine

Back in 2011 I wrote a post called «The Ancient Grinding Mills at Leine, Valdres». A few weeks ago I had a Couchsurfer visiting me from Poland and since she’s very interested in old architecture and viking stuff, I decided to re-process these old photos and post them again.

If you want to read about the history of this place, you can check out the original post. Unfortunately I can’t go back in time and improve my shooting skills, so some of the photos are a bit blurry, but I’ve improved my post-processing skills since then. Here’s the gallery from Leinekvernene:

And here’s a gallery with photos shot in the vicinity:

 

 

The grinding mills are situated near Leinesanden (The Leine Sand/ Leine Beach) which is said to be the place where «St. Olaf» (Olaf II Haraldsson, Olav Den Hellige) tried to violently force christianity upon the inhabitants of Vang. When «St. Olaf» forced the new superstition upon the people of Norway, he & his fellow christian men mutilated or murdered those who refused to accept the new, false god, and in some cases they also stole people’s property, so that people would fully comprehend the greatness of Jesus Christ (later on Christianity also stole pre-christian celebrations such as christmas & easter).

 

Original post: https://cardinalguzman.wordpress.com/2011/10/24/the-ancient-grinding-mills-at-leine-valdres/

This post is an entry to: https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/close-up/

Details from The Stave Church @ Folkemuseet

This is a follow-up post for one I wrote a month ago and an entry to Paula’s challenge. Read the story behind this stave church in the original post: The Stave Church @ Folkemuseet.

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The Stave Church @ Folkemuseet

This is the stave church at Norsk Folkemuseum (Norwegian Folk Museum) at Bygdøy, Oslo. The folk museum is Norway’s largest museum of cultural history, featuring the world’s oldest open air museum and large indoor collections.

The museum’s most popular attraction is Gol Stave Church. It was built around year 1200 and is one of 28 remaining stave churches in Norway.

The stave church at Gol was built in the 12th century. From the 1600s to early 1800s, the structure went through several renovations and alterations. In the 1870s, however, the congregation had become too large, so the old church was replaced by a new and bigger church. (norskfolkemuseum.no)

The Church Was Moved From Gol to Oslo
“In 1881, the Society for the Preservation of Ancient Norwegian Monuments bought the stave church, and King Oscar II offered to finance its re-erection in the public park at Bygdø Kongsgård. Because the snow conditions for sled transportation was too poor, the disassembled church could not be moved to Christiania (Oslo) before in January 1884! In the summer that same year, the church was re-erected at Bygdøy.” (norskfolkemuseum.no)

The term “stave” comes from the huge wooden posts which carries the structure. The entrance halls are richly decorated with flora and dragon motifs, while the dragon heads that adorn the end wall used Borgund Stave Church in Sogn as an example.

Gol Stave Chuch at Folkemuseet is probably Norway’s most visited stave church, but the world’s most visited stave church is Vang Stave Church in Poland.

Vang stave church (Polish: Świątynia Wang; Norwegian: Vang stavkyrkje) is a stave church which was bought by the Prussian King and transferred from the Vang in Valdres region of Norway and re-erected in 1842 in Brückenberg near Krummhübel in Germany, now Karpacz in the Karkonosze mountains of Poland. – Source: Wikipedia

Sources and additional reading:
Source 1: http://www.norskfolkemuseum.no/en/Stories/Set-2/The-Stave-Church/
Source 2: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vang_stave_church
More posts about stave churches: cardinalguzman.wordpress.com/category/stave-churches/ 

This post was my entry for Paula’s Thursday Challenge.

Rosekyrkja – The Rose Church

The Rose Church in Stordal

The Rose Church is an octagonal wooden church dating from 1789 C.E. It is famous for its wall paintings which cover the whole church’s interior. The paintings depict scenes from the Bible and stylized floral decoration in typical Norwegian style.

For those interested I’ve scanned some information about The Rose Church. It’s two PDF-files, one in English, the other in Nynorsk. The Rose Church is not a stave church, but I’ll publish it in my Stave Church section anyway, so that it’ll be easy to find for the many people that are interested in such buildings.

Follow one of these links for more information:

RoseChurch-English | Rosekyrkja-Nynorsk

The photos in this post are published under the Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 license and this post was my entry for: http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/adventure/.

 

Stave Churches in Norway: Reinli Stave Church

I’ve already written about Høre & Hedalen stave churches, but this will be my last (and shortest) post on Norwegian stave churches for a while. Just like the other two, Reinli stave church is also located in proximity to the main road (E16) that runs through Valdres, Norway. In the area called Valdres you’ll actually find 6 out of the remaining 28 stave churches in Norway. During the Middle Ages there was probably over 1000 stave churches in Norway and some believe it may have been as many as up to 2000 churches.  Continue reading

Stave Churches in Norway: Hedalen Stave Church

As some of you might know I’ve already written a post about the Norwegian Stave Church Høre. In my previous post you’ll find some general information regarding stave churches (and of course also about Høre), so if you’re interested in the subject you’ll hopefully find that post useful. First of all: Hedalen stave church can easily be confused with the similar named Heddal stave church, but these are two different stave churches and accoring to Captain Obvious they are to be found on separate locations. Hedalen stave church, which this post is about, is located in Sør-Aurdal, Valdres – in proximity to the main road called E16.
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Norske Stavkirker: Høre Stavkirke

I flere tiår nå har jeg lovet mine lesere et innlegg om stavkirker og endelig, etter lang ventetid, her er det: Den samme helgen som vi besøkte de gamle Leinekvernene dro vi også for å se noen stavkirker. Ettersom de alle ligger i nærheten av hverandre, tenkte vi: «Denne helgen har allerede utviklet seg til å bli en helg fylt med eldre, norsk, kulturhistorie, så hvorfor ikke gå for en overdose?» Så, jeg presenterer herved det første innlegget om norske stavkirker (hvis det blir for mye å lese for deg kan du nyte bildene):

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