Details from The Stave Church @ Folkemuseet

This is a follow-up post for one I wrote a month ago and an entry to Paula’s challenge. Read the story behind this stave church in the original post: The Stave Church @ Folkemuseet.

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The Stave Church @ Folkemuseet

This is the stave church at Norsk Folkemuseum (Norwegian Folk Museum) at Bygdøy, Oslo. The folk museum is Norway’s largest museum of cultural history, featuring the world’s oldest open air museum and large indoor collections.

The museum’s most popular attraction is Gol Stave Church. It was built around year 1200 and is one of 28 remaining stave churches in Norway.

The stave church at Gol was built in the 12th century. From the 1600s to early 1800s, the structure went through several renovations and alterations. In the 1870s, however, the congregation had become too large, so the old church was replaced by a new and bigger church. (norskfolkemuseum.no)

The Church Was Moved From Gol to Oslo
“In 1881, the Society for the Preservation of Ancient Norwegian Monuments bought the stave church, and King Oscar II offered to finance its re-erection in the public park at Bygdø Kongsgård. Because the snow conditions for sled transportation was too poor, the disassembled church could not be moved to Christiania (Oslo) before in January 1884! In the summer that same year, the church was re-erected at Bygdøy.” (norskfolkemuseum.no)

The term “stave” comes from the huge wooden posts which carries the structure. The entrance halls are richly decorated with flora and dragon motifs, while the dragon heads that adorn the end wall used Borgund Stave Church in Sogn as an example.

Gol Stave Chuch at Folkemuseet is probably Norway’s most visited stave church, but the world’s most visited stave church is Vang Stave Church in Poland.

Vang stave church (Polish: Świątynia Wang; Norwegian: Vang stavkyrkje) is a stave church which was bought by the Prussian King and transferred from the Vang in Valdres region of Norway and re-erected in 1842 in Brückenberg near Krummhübel in Germany, now Karpacz in the Karkonosze mountains of Poland. – Source: Wikipedia

Sources and additional reading:
Source 1: http://www.norskfolkemuseum.no/en/Stories/Set-2/The-Stave-Church/
Source 2: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vang_stave_church
More posts about stave churches: cardinalguzman.wordpress.com/category/stave-churches/ 

This post was my entry for Paula’s Thursday Challenge.

Stave Churches in Norway: Reinli Stave Church

I’ve already written about Høre & Hedalen stave churches, but this will be my last (and shortest) post on Norwegian stave churches for a while. Just like the other two, Reinli stave church is also located in proximity to the main road (E16) that runs through Valdres, Norway. In the area called Valdres you’ll actually find 6 out of the remaining 28 stave churches in Norway. During the Middle Ages there was probably over 1000 stave churches in Norway and some believe it may have been as many as up to 2000 churches.  Continue reading

Stave Churches in Norway: Høre Stave Church

For decades now I’ve promised my readers a post about Stave Churches and here it is: The same weekend that we visited the Ancient Grinding Mills at Leine, we also went to see some Stave Churches. Since they are all in the proximity, we figured: this has already turned out to be an “old Norwegian culture weekend, why not go for an overdose?” So, I hereby present the first presentation of Norwegian Stave Churches (if it’s too much to read for you, just enjoy the pictures):

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