Details from The Stave Church @ Folkemuseet

This is a follow-up post for one I wrote a month ago and an entry to Paula’s challenge. Read the story behind this stave church in the original post: The Stave Church @ Folkemuseet.

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B&W Architecture Guest Post 2:2

In the beginning of January I had a guest post in Paula’s blog on B&W architecture photography. Head over to Paula to read the full post (links to the original post and the follow-up post is in the end of this post).

The idea of my guest post was similar to my “Changing Seasons Challenge”, but it was all about B&W Architecture. Shooting the same place, to see if you could come up with something new: new angles, lines, curves, etc. It can be a good practice to try to reproduce shots –  you’ll probably notice that it’s difficult to get the same shot twice, even if you try.

Anyway. Here’s my gallery and please check out Paula’s post for the full article and check out the other entries.

I shot this photo last summer.

I shot this photo last summer and it was the photo that started it all.

Related posts:

Furuset Mosque

Furuset Moske: This mosque is located at Furuset in Oslo. If you’re arriving Norway via Norway’s main airport, Gardermoen, and take the airport shuttle bus or a rental car from there towards Oslo, this building is probably one of the first building that you’ll notice.

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This is the largest mosque in the Nordic countries and it can hold 4500 persons. The official name is Bait-un-Nasr mosque and it belongs to the congregation Ahmadiyya Muslim Jamaat Norway.

Here’s how it looks like from the road (photos shot while passing by in a car):

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Check out Paula’s post for more B&W photos of superstitious buildings: https://bopaula.wordpress.com/2015/04/05/black-white-sunday-religious-building/

The Stave Church @ Folkemuseet

This is the stave church at Norsk Folkemuseum (Norwegian Folk Museum) at Bygdøy, Oslo. The folk museum is Norway’s largest museum of cultural history, featuring the world’s oldest open air museum and large indoor collections.

The museum’s most popular attraction is Gol Stave Church. It was built around year 1200 and is one of 28 remaining stave churches in Norway.

The stave church at Gol was built in the 12th century. From the 1600s to early 1800s, the structure went through several renovations and alterations. In the 1870s, however, the congregation had become too large, so the old church was replaced by a new and bigger church. (norskfolkemuseum.no)

The Church Was Moved From Gol to Oslo
“In 1881, the Society for the Preservation of Ancient Norwegian Monuments bought the stave church, and King Oscar II offered to finance its re-erection in the public park at Bygdø Kongsgård. Because the snow conditions for sled transportation was too poor, the disassembled church could not be moved to Christiania (Oslo) before in January 1884! In the summer that same year, the church was re-erected at Bygdøy.” (norskfolkemuseum.no)

The term “stave” comes from the huge wooden posts which carries the structure. The entrance halls are richly decorated with flora and dragon motifs, while the dragon heads that adorn the end wall used Borgund Stave Church in Sogn as an example.

Gol Stave Chuch at Folkemuseet is probably Norway’s most visited stave church, but the world’s most visited stave church is Vang Stave Church in Poland.

Vang stave church (Polish: Świątynia Wang; Norwegian: Vang stavkyrkje) is a stave church which was bought by the Prussian King and transferred from the Vang in Valdres region of Norway and re-erected in 1842 in Brückenberg near Krummhübel in Germany, now Karpacz in the Karkonosze mountains of Poland. – Source: Wikipedia

Sources and additional reading:
Source 1: http://www.norskfolkemuseum.no/en/Stories/Set-2/The-Stave-Church/
Source 2: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vang_stave_church
More posts about stave churches: cardinalguzman.wordpress.com/category/stave-churches/ 

This post was my entry for Paula’s Thursday Challenge.

B&W Architecture Challenge 1:2

I have a guest post at Pauala’s blog. It’s in two parts and the first part is out now. Head over to Paula’s blog, to check out the post and join the challenge! https://bopaula.wordpress.com/2015/01/04/guest-challenge-architecture-in-black-white/

Thank God for the rain to wash the trash off the sidewalk

This is obviously a manipulated photo – the Cardinal version of Travis Bickle:

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«Thank God for the rain to wash the trash off the sidewalk.» – Travis Bickle. Original photo: 1976, New York, USA, Image by © Steve Schapiro/Corbis

The theme for #photo101 today is Treasure. The rain that washes the trash off the sidewalk, Taxi Driver, they’re both treasures.
If you’ve got time to waste, you should check out this list https://cardinalguzman.wordpress.com/movies/

We’re only here for a moment

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We’re only here for a moment.

The theme for #photo101 today is Moment. We’re only here for a moment, try to enjoy it while it lasts.

Here’s a tune from that a friend and I played in my mom’s funeral (which was not the one on the photo above). I guess the best way to describe the tune is classical guitars.