Jerusalem Street Photo

Street portrait. Jerusalem, February 2019.

Hasidic jews at the Western Wall in Jerusalem.

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shtreimel, שטרײַמל and a Jewish family

This spring I spent a few weeks in Israel where I, among other things, did a photo shoot (you’ll find one of the photos in the link section at the bottom of the post). When I was there Kathryn at vastlycurious.com asked me about the shtreimel. I’d figured that I’d use the answer I wrote her as a separate post, so here’s the explanations on this famous Jewish fur hat. The fur hat is called a shtreimel, which is a Yiddish word: שטרײַמל.

I met this lovely Jewish family in Jerusalem.

I met this lovely Jewish family in Jerusalem.

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Morning at the Western Wall

People performing their morning prayers at the Western Wall in Jerusalem.

Morning prayers at the Western Wall, Jerusalem.

“They will revere You at sun[rise], and before the moon, for all generations.” (Ps. 72:5). Morning prayers at the Western Wall, Jerusalem.

This photo is shot early morning during sunrise where a group of jews perform a prayer called Shacharit. Observant jews pray 3 times a day (women only pray once). The first prayer of the day is called Shacharit and must take place before 1/3 of the day is over. The other two prayers are Mincha in the afternoon (must take place before sunset) and Maariv in the evening/night after sunset.

As always you can click the photo to see a large version. It might look compressed in shitty browsers such as Internet Explorer 8 (this blog’s theme is not supported in older versions of Internet Explorer). If it looks weird just click the photo again and you’ll be able to see a correctly displayed version, but the best solution is to change your browser to Opera, Firefox or Chrome.

The sound of a wheel – Israeli music

The Polish-Jewish Maurycy Gottlieb's oil painting "Jews praying in synagogue on Yom Kippur" from 1878. Photo: Wikipedia

The Polish-Jewish Maurycy Gottlieb's oil painting "Jews praying in synagogue on Yom Kippur" from 1878. Photo: Wikipedia

Just thought I’d introduce some Israeli music. A great Israeli band, which unfortunately are no longer playing, called Shotei Ha’Nevua (sometimes also transcribed Shotey HaNevua) which means Fools of Prophecy. They played a lot of good songs, and in my opinion several that are better than this one that I’ll present here, but this one I is perhaps one of their most famous tunes.

I’ll try to translate the text but it is taken from the Kabbalahs “Sepher Zohar” which is a bit obscure and complicated. It is therefore difficult to make a correct translation, but I’ll do my best to re-write the text and convey and reproduce the literary qualities. Continue reading