questa casa non è un albergo

Thanks Lily Clic Photographie / Virgile Jourdan for taking my portraits at Linas Tattoo Convention this weekend.

Photo: Lily Clic Photographie / Virgile Jourdan

Photo: Lily Clic Photographie / Virgile Jourdan

Photo: Lily Clic Photographie / Virgile Jourdan

Photo: Lily Clic Photographie / Virgile Jourdan

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The photographer’s Mise en place

Mara Eastern said in a post on my other blog that she wanted to see some nude dudes. Well, tomorrow I’m shooting a friend (he won’t be nude – sorry Mara), so today I decided to clean the camera, test the flash, charge the batteries etc, etc. The photographer’s Mise en place. Which again led to this self-portrait.

Testing different flash settings... Self-portrait. I still got stuff attached to me after a hospital visit yesterday (had to document it).

Testing different flash settings… Self-portrait. I still got stuff attached to me after a hospital visit yesterday (had to document it).

Mise en place (French pronunciation: [mi zɑ̃ ˈplas]) is a French culinary phrase which means 
"putting in place" or "everything in its place." It refers to the set up required before cooking, 
and is often used in professional kitchens to refer to organizing and arranging the ingredients 
(e.g., cuts of meat, relishes, sauces, par-cooked items, spices, freshly chopped vegetables, 
and other components) that a cook will require for the menu items that are expected to be 
prepared during a shift.[1] - Wikipedia

 

Karius & Baktus

Instrumental version of the Karius & Baktus tune.

From Wikipedia:
Karius and Bactus (ISBN 0961539410) (original Norwegian title: Karius og Baktus) is a Norwegian children’s novel written and illustrated by Thorbjørn Egner. The book was first published in 1949 and produced as a 15-minute puppet animation film by Ivo Caprino in 1954. An English translation by Mike Sevig and Turi Olderheim was published in the United States in 1986.

The main characters are Karius (black haired) and Bactus (red haired). Their names are puns on Caries and Bacteria, and they are two small “tooth trolls” that live inside cavities in the teeth of a boy named Jens. They have a very good life, especially when Jens eats white bread with syrup and fails to brush his teeth afterwards. Eventually their homes are destroyed by the work of a dentist and they are rinsed out of Jens’ mouth through proper dental care.

The story of Karius and Bactus, with its humorous illustrations and important message, has become a classic of Norwegian children’s literature. Since its publication, the idea of “tooth trolls” has been used as a pedagogical device for generations of Scandinavian children.