Church near Linas

Church near Linas, France.

This church is in a village near Linas, France.

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Photoshop: Sharpen with High Pass

06 Finished Result

South African Penguin

Do you sharpen up your images in Photoshop? Perhaps you use one of the preset sharpen methods you find under the filter menu? (filter – sharpen).

Very often these presets are just exactly what you’ll need to enhance your photo, but sometimes you want to/need to have more control over the process. In this tutorial I’ll show you how to sharpen your image in just a few small steps using the High Pass filter.

The photo I’ve used in this tutorial is a scan from film. The star of the photo, the penguin,  was captured on a trip to Cape Town, South Africa.

  • Open your photo and copy the original layer (ctrl+j)
  • On the copied layer, choose the high pass filter (filter – other + high pass) (illustration 01)
    By default the radius is set to 10 pixels, which should be suitable.  Click OK.
  • Change the blending mode for the layer. Set it to Hard Light (illustration 02)
  • Play around with the opacity of the layer until you’re satisfied with the result.
  • If needed you can also add a Brightness/Contrast Layer, but this depends entirely on your photo.

Click on the gallery to see the process:

More tutorials:
The Alligator (add a lens blur effect to your photo)
Restore scanned photos in Photoshop

Cat Got a Good Treatment

He was bland, he was boring, he was lazy. So I had to frisk him up a little. 

cat_4590-origcat_4590

The original file was a .jpg file that I opened as .raw in Photoshop. I turned down the exposure by -0,65, added a lot of contrast and some clarity. Then I used the lens vignette filter and sat the slider to about -15 to center the focus a little. When I was pleased with the settings I opened the file.

The first thing I always do after opening a file is to make a copy of the layer. Make sure you never work on the original. I changed the settings in the HDR toning (Image – adjustments – hdr toning). After having done that I was still not satisfied, so I added a tiny touch of lens blur effect and then a saturation layer for the eyes.

Color VS B/W

The only thing I did here was to add vignette using the raw file in Photoshop

The only thing I did here was to add vignette using the raw file in Photoshop

I decided to try out Silver Efex for this black& white  photo. Normally I use Photoshop for my editing, but Jeff mentioned Silver Efex and then I suddenly remembered that I have a version installed. I’m not so familiar with the S.Efex software, so I can only do basic stuff, but it’s quite easy to maneuver and the GUI is user-friendly.
In my opinion both the results are pleasing and Silver Efex was easy to use (even for a Photoshopper like myself).

I chose a photo that I shot in the botanical garden here in Oslo. The color version has been edited in Photoshop and the only thing I did was to add some vignette using the raw file.
For the B/W version I changed the structure and contrast in Silver Efex Pro, then I Used Photoshop to add a brightness/contrast layer and a small touch of vignette with the Lens correction filter.

- Changed the structure and contrast in Silver Efex Pro. - Added brightness/contrast layer, plus a vignette with the Lens correction filter in Photoshop.

– Changed the structure and contrast in Silver Efex Pro. – Added brightness/contrast layer, plus a vignette with the Lens correction filter in Photoshop.

Now I’ll try to catch up on some commenting and blog reading 🙂

1970’s Ford from the Family Album

Here’s a quick scan & restore of another old family photo. I followed the same recipe like before, but I also added a levels layer for the car color & a brightness/contrast layer for the windshield. I believe the car is a 1970’s Ford Transit. 

Added levels layer for the car color & brightness/contrast layer for the windshield.

Added levels layer for the car color & brightness/contrast layer for the windshield.

Original photo, scanned from our family album.

Original photo, scanned from our family album.

If you want the full tutorial on how to restore your old photos, follow this link:

https://cardinalguzman.wordpress.com/2012/05/11/tutorial-restore-scanned-photos-in-photoshop/

Musical Portrait

Just watched episode 310 on Kelbytv.com and picked up this awesome technique. If you’re into Photoshop I recommend that you check them out in one of their channels. These tips are not only for advanced photoshoppers – Kelbytv.com makes sure to incorporate easy tips & tricks as well.

Musical Portrait by CardinalGuzman.wordpress.com

Musical Portrait by CardinalGuzman.wordpress.com

To see how I made this picture, check out the program and you might learn something new as well. I promise you: it’s an easy technique.
http://kelbytv.com/photoshopusertv/2012/07/10/episode-310/

You can also watch it on YouTube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMWuWegCka8

Tutorial: Restore Scanned Photos in Photoshop

Original, scanned photo.

Original, scanned photo.

This is  a detailed tutorial with screenshots. Many of you probably have old photos lying in a drawer or shoebox.
The first thing you should do if you intend to digitize these images, is to clean the surface of the images before scanning them. It’ll save you a lot of post-processing later. For this tutorial I’ve scanned a typical summer photo and I’ll restore the photo using Photoshop.

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