Manuella Ana | Salon International du tatouage

A few photos of Manuella Ana while she was working at the tattoo convention in Marseille this weekend – Salon International du tatouage, Marseille.

You can see more photos of Manuella Ana in my Flickr gallery: https://flic.kr/s/aHskNnVfKk
I’ll also upload more photos from the tattoo convention to the gallery during the next days.

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Street Portrait: Rebecca Goldberg – The Painter at Mahane Yehuda

הציירת משוק מחנה יהודה

Many years ago I shot this photo of (for me) an unknown painter at the Market (Shuk Mahane Yehuda שוק מחנה יהודה‎) in Jerusalem. If you’ve been to Jerusalem a few times, I’m pretty sure that you’ve seen her too. Perhaps a year or two later, I stumbled across an article on her in a Hebrew newspaper and I thought to myself that I should keep it, because the info in it might be useful for the photo that I took.

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רבקה גולדברג – Rebecca Goldberg (Rita)

Unfortunately my photo isn’t the best, because I didn’t have the photographing skills back then that I have today and also because I didn’t have the guts to go up to her and ask to take her portrait (I will definitely do that the next time I see her!). Of course, my copy of that newspaper is long gone and the only thing that’s left of it is a vague memory of the fact that I once had an article about her somewhere. When writing this post I tried to look up the article on the internet, but had no luck when searching with English search phrases. Once I switched to Hebrew I managed to find a couple of photos of her, but without her name mentioned. Then I decided to do an image search in Hebrew and by comparing the photos that I found of her and her art, I found a Hebrew article on one of her art shows that contained her name and other relevant info.

Here’s pieces of that article translated to English. The article was written by Amos Rabin and you’ll find a link to the full article in the link section.

Rebecca Goldberg (Rita)
Rebecca came from England in 1975, she has lived and painted in Jerusalem for about 35 years.
Jerusalem is the main subject in her paintings. The scenes in her paintings, takes place in the present and Rebecca documents the process of change. Her style also highlights the typical and special affection for Jerusalem: intimate, everyday life in the older neighborhoods.Sometimes the people, the environment and the connections between them  are swallowed up in the environment and become part of it and sometimes they are the center of the drama.
Rebecca’s paintings evoke the visual attention of viewers, to find beauty in the unexpected fabric of the city. (source: http://www.art.org.il/)

Rebecca Goldberg is expressing herself through paintings.

Check out these links for more info and photos:

The following info is unrelated to the post, but I thought I'd share it anyway: 
This post is one of many drafts that I had saved. These days I'm not very active in the blog world, 
simply because "life got in the way". I'll try to keep on posting more or less regularly, 
but don't be disappointed if you don't get any return visits or if I don't answer your comments. 
I'll hopefully be back on track as soon as things settle down. 
For sure I will keep my Monthly Photo Challenge: The Changing Seasons going (and please feel free 
to join, it's never too late!), but other than that I can't promise that I'll be as 
active as I've been lately. I'm sure you can all understand and relate to this.
Have a great weekend!

Female Photographers

Why is it that Nikon & Canon focus (pun intended) mainly on male photographers, even if the ‘female market’ obviously is large and fast growing? A huge chunk of the market, regardless of gender, is of course the typical amateur photographer whose main focus is family and holiday memories, while the professional organisations still have more men represented than women.

Grete Stern

Grete Stern

The sentences above were discussed in Leanne Cole‘s blog a while back. I commented on her post and later decided to write my own post about it.

I’m not a camera salesman, so for me the market part of photographing isn’t interesting: who’s buying most cameras – women or men? This doesn’t concern me. The only thing that concerns me is what they produce with the cameras. The big majority of people take pictures to produce family memories, boring pictures of their cats, plants and so called ‘Facebook-moments’ (previously known as Kodak Moments). They’re also using their phone cameras to document whatever they’re having for dinner at some restaurant.

Many professional organizations largely consists of press photographers and in this line of work, the photographer is often ‘out in the fields’ in different war zones – a job where you’ll mostly find men, probably because of mental and physical differences between the sexes (men are often more adrenaline seeking, careless and violent than women). A lot of war photography is just about being at the right place at the right time or faking a scene – and it’s more often than not political propaganda. Of course this is just a matter of taste, but in my opinion male photographers such as war photographer Robert Capa and street photographer Henri Cartier Bresson are wildly overrated.

Many (most) of my favourite photographers are women.

  • Daniela Rossell:  I wrote an article on Daniela Rossell’s wonderful series «ricas y famosas». I really love her her ethnographic look at the Mexican upper-class’ tastes and lifestyles: she has a closeness & intimacy with her subjects. https://cardinalguzman.wordpress.com/2011/08/26/daniela-rosell-the-rich-andfamous/
  • Graciela Iturbide: Another great Mexican, female photographer is Graciela Iturbide. Some of my favourite works are Zihuatanejo, Ciudad de México, Desierto de Sonora and Juchitán (from the series named after the photo Juchitán)
  • Grete Stern: a lot of great surrealist works and double exposures. She made 150 photomontages, called Suenos (dreams). Fantastic!
  • Herlinde Koelbl: German photographer Herlinde Koelbl had some interesting photos in her exhibition “mein blick” where she took portraits of people in their apartments: a wonderful glimpse of homo sapiens in their natural habitat.
  • Madame Yevonde: Madame Yevonde’s portrait of Lady Bridgett as Arethusa. A classic!
  • Wanda Wulz: Another of my blog posts was inspired by another female, Wanda Wulz. Her photo «The Cat and I» is double exposure at it’s best! I made some double exposure collages inspired by that photo: https://cardinalguzman.wordpress.com/2014/05/07/when-the-kitty-gets-the-cream/
  • Shirim Neshat: Iranian born Shirim Neshat has some interesting photos as well. Rumor has it that her photos are very provocative in Iran.Then again most things seems to be very provocative in Iran. Unfortunately I don’t know her works that well and I’ve never been to her exhibitions, but what I’ve seen so far has been very interesting.

Enjoy this gallery with some selected photos of the mentioned photographers. Disclaimer: I have no rights over these images. I tried to contact the photographers that are still alive to get permission to publish these photos, but some didn’t answer and I was unable to find contact information for the others. I’m assuming that they won’t mind having their photos published in a non-profit, personal blog like this.        

 

Art: Daniela Rossell – The Rich and Famous

Here’s an old case, from some years back. It was originally published in the Norwegian newspaper Morgenbladet, in August 2004.

‘Nicolaj Udstillingsbygning’ shows in their summer exhibition “Rich and Famous” by the Mexican photographer Daniela Rossell. In color photographs that catch you off guard Daniela Rossell’s turns her ethnographic look at the Mexican upper-class’ tastes and lifestyles. The social photography turns its head and directs its focus towards the wealthy upper-class’ conspicuous luxury and economic power.

Daniela Rossell - Ricas y famosas

Daniela Rossell – Ricas y famosas

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