The Changing Seasons: January 2016

Welcome to this challenge that’s called «The Changing Seasons 2016». As most of you already know, there are two versions to choose from this year; the original (V1) which is purely photographic and the new version (V2) where you can allow yourself to be more artistic and post a painting, a recipe, a digital manipulation, or simply just one photo that you think represents the month. Anyone with a blog can join this challenge and it’ll run throughout 2016.

The bikes in Bjørvika

The bikes in Bjørvika

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Oslo – A Village on Steroids

Oslo is a village on steroids and I’m looking forward to the rage roid…


Except for the panorama, all of these are shot from Ekebergåsen – a place where you have a nice view over the city. From here you can see Holmenkollen, The Barcode Area, the Opera House, the harbour, the city center and most of what Oslo has to offer.

Check out other places in Jo’s Monday Walk: http://restlessjo.wordpress.com/2015/01/05/jos-monday-walk-whitby-in-winter/

star effects | double

A few weeks ago a fellow blogger asked me how you get the star effects on artificial light in night photos. That person thought it was a stupid question, but I disagree. I think it’s a good question and I think that it’s good to ask about stuff. Without asking questions, there would be no new knowledge.

In my two example shots, you can clearly see the star effect appearing when shooting at a small aperture (I shot at f/22).

Compare the two shot at 25,0 sec at f/22, ISO 100 and 2,0 sec at f/4,5, ISO 100.

The theme for #photo101 today is Double.

If you really want to get nerdy and dirty, here’s further reading on the star effect for you:

Barcode Nightscape

On the edge of the Oslo Fjord you’ll find the Barcode area. I went there on Monday night to eat at one of the new restaurants and to take some new photos of the area.

In these two shots I’ve played with different looks: one outrageous, almost HDR looking photo. The other a bit more toned down, but still sparkling. Personally I prefer the slightly toned down version, but I know that a lot of people like pictures that are highly saturated. Especially when it comes to night photography.

 

 

The theme for #photo101 today is Edge.

If you want to find out more about the Barcode area, you ‘ll find info on Wikipedia about the style and the controversies:

Some are enthusiastic about the fresh architecture, the “champagne apartments,” and the unmatched opportunity to reshape the urban landscape and relieve pressure on a rapidly growing city without diminishing existing green space. However, there has been widespread criticism of the heights and designs of the Barcode buildings, both from architects and from citizens of Oslo. The Barcode has been described as a barrier between the fjord and the rest of the city that will destroy Oslo’s character as an open, low-rise city with a lot of green space and cast a permanent shadow on adjacent neighborhoods for the benefit of a rich few. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barcode_Project_%28Oslo%29)

 

Landmark: The Oslo Opera

The theme for #photo101 today is Landmark and the Opera House in Oslo fits that category.

OsloOpera_8830Last year I printed this panoramic photo on an aluminium plate measuring 40×120 cm (that would be approximately 16×47 inches if you live in one of the 3 countries – Liberia, Myanmar or USA – that are still using the archaic imperial system). Trivia: I once worked in construction and I was part of the large team that built the Opera. Here you can see the printed version of this photo: https://cardinalguzman.wordpress.com/2014/05/28/my-largest-print-so-far/

My Largest Print So Far

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I printed this panoramic photo of the Oslo Opera House as a gift to a relative. The measures are 40×120 cm. That would be approximately 16×47 inches using the idiotic system (it’ll actually make more sense to use nautical miles instead of the imperial system. In nautical miles the photo measures 0.000215983 X 0.000647948). It’s my largest print so far and I’m pleased with the result. It was printed on an aluminium plate (No! Not aluminum, but aluminium).

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Barcode in B&W

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These Oslo buildings are known as The Barcode. It’s mostly financial institutions, plus a few overpriced apartments. I have a lot of earlier posts from this area and I’ve also posted this one before only in colours (it looks better in colours I think). The B&W version you see here is for Paula’s «B&W Sunday».

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