Monochrome Strømsfoss

Here’s my entry for Leanne & Laura’s Monochrome Madness Challenge this week.

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Strømsfoss, Norway (click to see large version).

You can see my Adobe Lightroom settings & Adobe Photoshop layers in this gallery:

After I’m finished with the settings in Lightroom, I export the file and open it in Photoshop. This is my Photoshop workflow (see the Photoshop layers picture for reference):

  • In Lightroom I used a preset called Antique Light. I tweaked the settings to what you see in the “Lightroom settings” image in the gallery and exported the image.
  • Open the exported photo in Photoshop.
  • In Photoshop: The layer Background Copy is the one I work on. The layer named Background is the original, as it looked when I exported it from Lightroom.
  • On the background copy I used a low opacity brush and added some dodge & burn (in the corners, around the edges, on the trees, boats and their reflections).
  • The Old book cover layer is set to darken with an opacity of 50%
  • The 4 tape layers are set to multiply at 100% opacity
  • The grain & noise layer: I used the Paint Bucket tool to fill the layer with black. Set the layer opacity to 28% and then used filter – noise – add noise, ticked off monochromatic with uniform distribution at 16,5%
  • Then I added my watermark, file info and saved as a jpeg.

Related Posts: 

More tutorial posts: 

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Converting into Black & White using Photoshop & Lightroom

I wanted to write a tutorial on how I post-process images and show you this method to turn them into black and white. This is just one of many methods. The software I use is Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop. As you can see, the original image is rather boring and flat, with a grey sky and not a lot of contrast. 

IMG_8563_original

Original image. Boring and flat, with a grey sky and a lack of contrast.

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Natalia Kuternoga

Model: Natalia Kuternoga

Model: Natalia Kuternoga

The Process

  • At first I shot photos of the model, Natalia Kuternoga in the studio of the Polish photographer Jacek Ura.
  • After the photo shoot I did some basic adjustments to the photo in Adobe Lightroom, exported the result and opened it in Adobe Photoshop.
  • The first thing I did in Photoshop was to make selections to separate the model and background.
  • Then I created a displacement map from a photo I took of a worn down graffiti wall in an old fort near Krakow in Poland.
  • I added the displacement map plus a few details from a color splash photo.
  • Separated two copies of the models left eye. Changed the settings, dodge and burned and finally merged the layers when I had my wanted result.
  • Brushed in a couple of leaves from the standard Photoshop brushes
  • I then changed the overall colors of the photo by adding several layer masks (the following numbered list is reversed, so # would be the bottom, # 5 on top):
  1. a black & white layer
  2. gradient map red/orange set to color and with lowered opacity
  3. copy of gradient map set to soft light and a very low opacity
  4. a gradient fill ranging from dark to light green and set to soft light
  5. a color balance layer with a medium opacity and individual settings for the shadows, mid-tones and highlights
    • The first layer was set to screen mode with a high opacity before I brushed out the unwanted parts leaving the effect basically on the left side of the photo.
    • The flames was added as 3 layers from two different shots I have in my catalog.
    • The second layer is another photo of flames, set to darken and medium opacity. Also on this layer I brushed away the effects using a layer mask.
    • The third flame layer is a copy of the second, but now set to luminosity with a medium strong opacity (and off course with an individual layer mask like all the other layers).

Now the image looks something like what I wanted it to look, so it’s time to go through all the layers and layer masks, change the opacity if needed, brush out masks, and do minor adjustments. I decided to make another copy of the eye, create a selection, border the selection and paint a white circle. I sat the blend mode to lighter color and lowered the opacity and fill drastically,  so that it left a hint of some crazy iris but without becoming too dominant.

Model: Natalia Kuternoga.

Photo, execution, idea, design, layout: Cardinal Guzman

This was my entry for WordPress’ Weekly Photo Challenge: Hue.

Tutorial: Color the sky with Lightroom

Do you use Adobe Lightroom for your image editing? Here I’ll quickly show you how to get some more color on that bland sky. 

If I have a photo like this one, where the skies are a bit bland and boring, instead of changing the saturation of the whole image, I pull down the blue luminance slider. It makes the blue more dark and can really help to lift the sky in a photo.
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Recreate the Bokeh Effect

Tutorial: Recreate the bokeh effect using Photoshop

Half a decade ago we went on an evening walk where we shot some photos.  Unfortunately a lot of the pictures are out of focus and/or the exposure is wrong. The camera I used at the time was good, but not good enough: for example the view screen was small and the camera had a lot of noise at high ISO levels. I didn’t have a tripod either, but the main problem was (and I’ll honestly admit this) that my photographic skills at the time just weren’t good enough to capture the photos the way I pictured them in my mind.

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Photoshop: Sharpen with High Pass

06 Finished Result

South African Penguin

Do you sharpen up your images in Photoshop? Perhaps you use one of the preset sharpen methods you find under the filter menu? (filter – sharpen).

Very often these presets are just exactly what you’ll need to enhance your photo, but sometimes you want to/need to have more control over the process. In this tutorial I’ll show you how to sharpen your image in just a few small steps using the High Pass filter.

The photo I’ve used in this tutorial is a scan from film. The star of the photo, the penguin,  was captured on a trip to Cape Town, South Africa.

  • Open your photo and copy the original layer (ctrl+j)
  • On the copied layer, choose the high pass filter (filter – other + high pass) (illustration 01)
    By default the radius is set to 10 pixels, which should be suitable.  Click OK.
  • Change the blending mode for the layer. Set it to Hard Light (illustration 02)
  • Play around with the opacity of the layer until you’re satisfied with the result.
  • If needed you can also add a Brightness/Contrast Layer, but this depends entirely on your photo.

Click on the gallery to see the process:

More tutorials:
The Alligator (add a lens blur effect to your photo)
Restore scanned photos in Photoshop

Tutorial: Restore Scanned Photos in Photoshop

Original, scanned photo.

Original, scanned photo.

This is  a detailed tutorial with screenshots. Many of you probably have old photos lying in a drawer or shoebox.
The first thing you should do if you intend to digitize these images, is to clean the surface of the images before scanning them. It’ll save you a lot of post-processing later. For this tutorial I’ve scanned a typical summer photo and I’ll restore the photo using Photoshop.

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