Skull with Curly Hair

Skull with curly hair.

Skull with curly hair. Model: Magdalena

I’ll admit that this portrait is shot using artificial light. I might also have altered the image slightly using software. If you ever come across a woman looking like this, then quickly head for a new horizon..

Check out Paula’s post for more B&W Sunday stuff or WordPress for more horizons:

The Changing Seasons: September 2016 / V2

When I posted «The Changing Seasons» for September, I didn’t have enough time or whatever to create something for V2, so I decided to join my own challenge.

That’s why this is my entry to my own challenge «The Changing Seasons».

Album de oro de Cardinal Guzman

Album de oro de Cardinal Guzman

I spotted this Enrique Guzman album on the street one day, maybe a year or two ago, and I knew I had to make something out of it some day. This doesn’t represent September in any way, but in my defense I’ll mention that the photo of me there, is decades old and what’s more representative of changing seasons than your own, decaying self? Yey! 😀
If you want to check out the music of Enrique Guzman, you can find his stuff on YouTube. Personally I think it’s horrorshow and that you should check out my YouTube channel instead: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX1ahxKvmOSCD9yBz6WymLA

To read about the challenge, visit the following post and also check out the other entries. Lots of great photos from awesome people!

https://cardinalguzman.wordpress.com/2016/09/18/the-changing-seasons-september-2016/

These are the rules for Version 2 (The Changing Seasons V2):

    • Tag your posts with #MonthlyPhotoChallenge and #TheChangingSeasons
    • Each month, post one photo (recipe, painting, drawing, whatever) that represents your interpretation of the month.
    • Don’t use archive stuff. Only new material!

TheChangingSeasons_6367

The Changing Seasons: July 2016

My changing seasons post this month is a scheduled post.

I don’t have many photos from this month (yet) and the ones that I do have is basically just different takes on the same scene. I went nuts on the post-processing, but it was fun and I don’t regret it! Hehe. Hopefully, after the summer, I’ll have plenty of landscape photos and lots of portraits to share with you.

I also had time to create something artistic for the V2 (version 2) part of the challenge this month.

nude model monkey skull

This is a double exposure (post-process) of a nude model that I shot in a studio and a monkey skull I captured at a scientific museum (Yes, I’m a geek that sometimes do “boring stuff” like visiting museums).

What’s this «Changing Seasons» blogging challenge?

«The Changing Seasons 2016» is a blogging challenge with two versions: the original (V1) which is purely photographic and the new version (V2) where you can allow yourself to be more artistic and post a painting, a recipe, a digital manipulation, or simply just one photo that you think represents the month. Anyone with a blog can join this challenge and it’ll run throughout 2016. It doesn’t matter if you couldn’t join the first month(s), late-comers are welcomed. These are the rules, but they’re not written in stone – you can always improvise, mix & match to suit your own liking:

These are the rules for Version 1 (The Changing Seasons V1):

  • Tag your posts with #MonthlyPhotoChallenge and #TheChangingSeasons
  • Each month, post 5-20 photos in a gallery.
  • Don’t use photos from your archive. Only new shots.

These are the rules for Version 2 (The Changing Seasons V2):

  • Tag your posts with #MonthlyPhotoChallenge and #TheChangingSeasons
  • Each month, post one photo (recipe, painting, drawing, whatever) that represents your interpretation of the month.
  • Don’t use archive stuff. Only new material!

Links to participants:

Also make sure to out my spreadshirt shop:

kvinner-spreadshirt-1123203

Norwegian shop (NOK):
https://shop.spreadshirt.no/1123203/

English (EURO):

http://shop.spreadshirt.no/100035802

TheChangingSeasons_6367

Vltava River in Praha

I decided to make two HDR versions of 3 bracketed shots of The Vltava River in Praha (Prague).

One version is with my tweakings using Photoshop, plus further editing in Lightroom. The other version is basically the automated HDR version I got using Lightroom, with only minor adjustments.

The Vltava river in Praha.

The Vltava river in Praha.

The Vltava river in Praha.

The Vltava river in Praha.

From Wikipedia:
The Vltava (IPA: /vəlˈtɑvə/; Czech pronunciation: [ˈvl̩tava]; German: Moldau, IPA: [ˈmɔldaʊ]) is the longest river within the Czech Republic, running southeast along the Bohemian Forest and then north across Bohemia, through Český Krumlov, České Budějovice and Prague, and finally merging with the Elbe at Mělník. It is commonly referred to as the Czech national river.

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Enjoying a glass of Absinthe in Prague.

Enjoying a glass of Absinthe in Prague.

Some Absinthe info from Wikipedia:

Absinthe is historically described as a distilled, highly alcoholic (45–74% ABV) beverage. It is an anise-flavoured spirit derived from botanicals, including the flowers and leaves of Artemisia absinthium (“grand wormwood”), together with green anise, sweet fennel, and other medicinal and culinary herbs. Absinthe traditionally has a natural green colour but may also be colourless. It is commonly referred to in historical literature as “la fée verte” (the green fairy). Although it is sometimes mistakenly referred to as a liqueur, absinthe is not traditionally bottled with added sugar; it is therefore classified as a spirit. Absinthe is traditionally bottled at a high level of alcohol by volume, but it is normally diluted with water prior to being consumed.

Absinthe originated in the canton of Neuchâtel in Switzerland in the late 18th century. It rose to great popularity as an alcoholic drink in late 19th- and early 20th-century France, particularly among Parisian artists and writers. Owing in part to its association with bohemian culture, the consumption of absinthe was opposed by social conservatives and prohibitionists. Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Charles Baudelaire, Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Amedeo Modigliani, Pablo Picasso, Vincent van Gogh, Oscar Wilde, Marcel Proust, Aleister Crowley, Erik Satie, Edgar Allan Poe, Lord Byron and Alfred Jarry were all known absinthe drinkers.

Absinthe has often been portrayed as a dangerously addictive psychoactive drug and hallucinogen. The chemical compound thujone, although present in the spirit in only trace amounts, was blamed for its alleged harmful effects. By 1915, absinthe had been banned in the United States and in much of Europe, including France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland and Austria-Hungary. Although absinthe was vilified, it has not been demonstrated to be any more dangerous than ordinary spirits. Recent studies have shown that absinthe’s psychoactive properties (apart from that of the alcohol) have been exaggerated.

Etymology
The French word absinthe can refer either to the alcoholic beverage or, less commonly, to the actual wormwood plant, with grande absinthe being Artemisia absinthium, and petite absinthe being Artemisia pontica. The Latin name artemisia comes from Artemis, the ancient Greek goddess of the hunt. Absinthe is derived from the Latin absinthium, which in turn comes from the ancient Greek ἀψίνθιον apsínthion, “wormwood”. The use of Artemisia absinthium in a drink is attested in Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura (I 936–950), where Lucretius indicates that a drink containing wormwood is given as medicine to children in a cup with honey on the brim to make it drinkable.

Absinthe’s popularity grew steadily through the 1840s, when absinthe was given to French troops as a malaria preventive. When the troops returned home, they brought their taste for absinthe home with them. The custom of drinking absinthe gradually became so popular in bars, bistros, cafés, and cabarets that, by the 1860s, the hour of 5 p.m. was called l’heure verte (“the green hour”). Absinthe was favoured by all social classes, from the wealthy bourgeoisie, to poor artists and ordinary working-class people. By the 1880s, mass production had caused the price of absinthe to drop sharply. By 1910, the French were drinking 36 million litres of absinthe per year, as compared to their annual consumption of almost 5 billion litres of wine.

The drink was banned in France in 1914.

Absinthe has been consumed in the Czech countries (then part of Austria-Hungary) since at least 1888, notably by Czech artists, some of whom had an affinity for Paris, frequenting Prague’s famous Café Slavia. Its wider appeal in Bohemia itself is uncertain, though it was sold in and around Prague.

In 1905, it was reported that Jean Lanfray, a Swiss farmer, murdered his family and attempted to take his own life after drinking absinthe. The fact that Lanfray was an alcoholic who had consumed considerable quantities of wine and brandy prior to drinking two glasses of absinthe was overlooked or ignored, therefore placing the blame for the murders solely on absinthe.

In May 2011, the French Absinthe Ban of 1915 was repealed following petitions by the Fédération Française des Spiritueux, who represent French distillers.

A water carafe is the most basic and original way to add water. As with other items, many have been found with brand names on them. The carafe is held above the glass and water is delicately added in a thin stream.

Fountains appeared in bars and bistros in the late 1800s as absinthe gained greater popularity. Most often it was a large glass globe on a tall metal stand that held between two and six spigots. It allowed a small party of drinkers to accurately prepare their absinthe all at once with a slow, thin stream of cold water but did not require the steady hand required by a carafe.

You can read more about the interesting history of Absinthe on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absinthe. This is my entry for WordPress’ Weekly Photo Challenge: Face

Now you can follow me on my public and official Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cguzmanofficial/