Travel Friendly Tripod

Because I’m going to Italy (my colleague is picking me up in an hour), I decided to buy a new tripod. The one I already have (Induro AKB1 | AT113)  is a very good and stable tripod, but it’s too large for travels and it ends up spending most of its time home alone.

So, this morning I went to the local toy store Scandinavian Photo and bought a Benro IT25. It can fit in a small suitcase, which means that it’s good for travelling. It’s made out of aluminium. They had some lighter carbon tripods there too, but the prices were too high. The aluminum one was something like 400 grams heavier and about 100 Euro cheaper.

In the camera bag I've packed:  
Olympus OMD EM5II
A 45mm, f1.8. Lens 
A 40-150mm, f2.8 lens
One ND8, plus one ND32 filter. 
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 with a 12-32mm f3.5

Now I’m looking forward to try out this new tripod.

Specifications for Benro IT25:  
Sections: 5
Maximum height: 1545mm
Folded: 415mm
Weight 1,61kg
Load: 6kg

Enjoy your weekend!

Related posts:

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star effects | double

A few weeks ago a fellow blogger asked me how you get the star effects on artificial light in night photos. That person thought it was a stupid question, but I disagree. I think it’s a good question and I think that it’s good to ask about stuff. Without asking questions, there would be no new knowledge.

In my two example shots, you can clearly see the star effect appearing when shooting at a small aperture (I shot at f/22).

Compare the two shot at 25,0 sec at f/22, ISO 100 and 2,0 sec at f/4,5, ISO 100.

The theme for #photo101 today is Double.

If you really want to get nerdy and dirty, here’s further reading on the star effect for you:

Long Exposure & Flash Photo Shoot

About a month ago I published some photos from a photo shoot with Tomer & Shanny. After we had been a while and shot a lot of photos at the location, I wanted to experiment a little bit – it gets boring to just do the same shots over and over – so, to get a more playful and artistic look, I mounted the camera on the tripod and set the camera to long exposure while I used the flash & zoom.

Check out the dailypost.wordpress.com for more photos for WordPress’ Weekly Photo Challenge “Extra”.

Previous posts from this photo shoot: 

Forced Perspective

When I saw the theme for WordPress’ Weekly Photo Challenge this week, I immediately thought of forced perspective – not cropping images.  

 

An example of forced perspective.

An example of forced perspective.

«Forced perspective is a technique that employs optical illusion to make an object appear farther away, closer, larger or smaller than it actually is. It is used primarily in photography, filmmaking and architecture. It manipulates human visual perception through the use of scaled objects and the correlation between them and the vantage point of the spectator or camera.» (Wikipedia)

Get perspective here: 

Trying a Sigma lens at the Travel Exhibition

Sigma 85mm f1.4 ex dg hsm. photo: dslrphoto.com

Sigma 85mm f1.4 ex dg hsm. photo: dslrphoto.com

Last weekend we went to the annual Travel Exhibition (you can read about the previous one in the link section). The previous years this exhibition has been held in Lillestrøm in co-operation with the Photo Exhibition, which has (at least for me) been a perfect combination. This year they separated the two exhibitions, to my huge disappointment.

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Photoshop: Sharpen with High Pass

06 Finished Result

South African Penguin

Do you sharpen up your images in Photoshop? Perhaps you use one of the preset sharpen methods you find under the filter menu? (filter – sharpen).

Very often these presets are just exactly what you’ll need to enhance your photo, but sometimes you want to/need to have more control over the process. In this tutorial I’ll show you how to sharpen your image in just a few small steps using the High Pass filter.

The photo I’ve used in this tutorial is a scan from film. The star of the photo, the penguin,  was captured on a trip to Cape Town, South Africa.

  • Open your photo and copy the original layer (ctrl+j)
  • On the copied layer, choose the high pass filter (filter – other + high pass) (illustration 01)
    By default the radius is set to 10 pixels, which should be suitable.  Click OK.
  • Change the blending mode for the layer. Set it to Hard Light (illustration 02)
  • Play around with the opacity of the layer until you’re satisfied with the result.
  • If needed you can also add a Brightness/Contrast Layer, but this depends entirely on your photo.

Click on the gallery to see the process:

More tutorials:
The Alligator (add a lens blur effect to your photo)
Restore scanned photos in Photoshop

Negative Space – Akam Photo Challenge

There’s a Norwegian photography website (www.akam.no) that has a forum for photographers. Every second Sunday they have a theme (similar to the Weekly Photo Challenge on WordPress) and for the theme on Sunday the 25th of November they asked me to be the host. The theme I chose was Negative Space and this is what I wrote (and the photo I posted):

A form of negative space is silhouettes. In this photograph we see the silhouette of an earlier building.

A form of negative space is silhouettes. In this photograph we see the silhouette of an earlier building.

«Negative Space – the gap around and between the object / subject in an image.  

When you compose a photograph, there are a number of rules (or ‘loose guidelines’ as I prefer to think of them as) that you’re supposed to keep in mind. This is in addition to the purely technical aspects of photographing. Typical examples of such rules are: lines, shapes, colors, the Rule of Thirds and vanishing points.

A useful tool that is often overlooked when talking about compositions is what’s called ‘Negative Space’. Negative Space is, simply put, the air filling the picture. Such air / empty space can be useful to guide the eye, or to emphasize details in a picture.

So, now I hope many of you go out with your cameras to think really negative (pun intended) and record your contributions.»

– – – – – –

If you want to see how other Norwegian photographers interpreted «Negative Space», you can follow this link:

http://www.akam.no/bildekritikk/aktiviteter/temadag-negativt-rom-tomrommet-rundt-og-mellom-objektet-subjektet-i-et-bilde/165/

Feel free to come up with your own photographic interpretation of Negative Space and leave me a link here in blog.