Monochrome Strømsfoss

Here’s my entry for Leanne & Laura’s Monochrome Madness Challenge this week.

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Strømsfoss, Norway (click to see large version).

You can see my Adobe Lightroom settings & Adobe Photoshop layers in this gallery:

After I’m finished with the settings in Lightroom, I export the file and open it in Photoshop. This is my Photoshop workflow (see the Photoshop layers picture for reference):

  • In Lightroom I used a preset called Antique Light. I tweaked the settings to what you see in the “Lightroom settings” image in the gallery and exported the image.
  • Open the exported photo in Photoshop.
  • In Photoshop: The layer Background Copy is the one I work on. The layer named Background is the original, as it looked when I exported it from Lightroom.
  • On the background copy I used a low opacity brush and added some dodge & burn (in the corners, around the edges, on the trees, boats and their reflections).
  • The Old book cover layer is set to darken with an opacity of 50%
  • The 4 tape layers are set to multiply at 100% opacity
  • The grain & noise layer: I used the Paint Bucket tool to fill the layer with black. Set the layer opacity to 28% and then used filter – noise – add noise, ticked off monochromatic with uniform distribution at 16,5%
  • Then I added my watermark, file info and saved as a jpeg.

Related Posts: 

More tutorial posts: 

Tutorial: Color the sky with Lightroom

Do you use Adobe Lightroom for your image editing? Here I’ll quickly show you how to get some more color on that bland sky. 

If I have a photo like this one, where the skies are a bit bland and boring, instead of changing the saturation of the whole image, I pull down the blue luminance slider. It makes the blue more dark and can really help to lift the sky in a photo.
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