At Solli’s Plass (Solli’s Square) in Oslo you’ll find these swastikas in the wrought iron gate of Sommerogata 1. Originally this apartment building was built for Oslo Lysverker (one of Oslo’s power companies) in 1931, and the arrchitects Andreas Bjerke and Gerog Eliassen won a price for good architecture. At the time Norwegians and Europeans didn’t have the same connotations towards Swastikas like they have today. The swastikas can still be seen in Sommerogata 1 today.

The symbol has a long history in Europe reaching back to antiquity. In modern times, following a brief surge of popularity as a good luck symbol in Western culture, a swastika was adopted as a symbol of the Nazi Party of Germany in 1920, who used the swastika as a symbol of the Aryan race. A right-facing 45° rotated swastika was incorporated into the flag of the Nazi Party, which was made the state flag of Germany during the Nazi era, after Adolf Hitler came to power in 1933. Hence in many western countries the swastika is stigmatized as being associated with Nazism and related concepts like antisemitism, hatred, violence, death, and murder. – en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swastika